How to Take Better Train Travel Photos

For an Internet Rail Travelogue, and for Personal Use.

By Carl Morrison at MoKnowsPhotos.com - Carl@TrainWeb.com - TrainWeb.org/Carl

(The photo examples are best viewed while online, since some references are to photos on other web pages of mine.)

Click any photo to see a double-sized copy, click BACK in your browser to return to this page.


11.  Shoot from different angles, and take unique, behind-the-scenes shots.

Do not just shoot from eye level.  Climb to a higher spot to look down on the scene,  or kneel for a lower, more dramatic shot.

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The above shot was obviously from a 'higher spot,' namely the balcony on the 3rd floor of the MTA Gateway Center  in Los Angeles, a 'different angle.'
 



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This shot was taken from 'knee level.'
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This shot of the Challenger in Denver was from a bridge.  The cool weather made the steam more dramatic and the vertical format emphasized the steam.

Include photos of employees and photos of your travel companions.  Be sure you have permission before posting anyone's photo on the Internet.  Rather than posting a fellow traveler's name with the photo, it is best to post their hometown.  When posting an employee's name, usually available on their nametag, with their picture, it is best to get permission.

11a.  Photograph your Fellow Travel Companions:

In all situations below, these pictures were not shot on Amtrak, but rather on US Tourist Trains, or Mexican trains where open vestibules are a welcomed place to take pictures.


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Brother Don, on the Great Smoky Mountains Railway.
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Fellow traveler on the Expresso Maya in Mexico.
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Chris Guenzler, above, in the cupola of a caboose in Ely, NV, Steam in Winter photo shoot.

Preacher Roe (right) on the Chepe in Mexico, headed for the Copper Canyon.
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Skunk Train Open Car with handrails for safety and viewing tall redwoods.

11b. Photograph Employees

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This strolling musician made our Skunk Train trip most enjoyable.
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This engineer worked from early morning until after dark making our Photo Shoot of Steam in Winer at Ely, NV, a great success.

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The "Train Singer" on the Skunk Train looked best with fill flash since he was standing in the shade.
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11.12
I met this artist on the Coast Starlight who drew postcards of what she saw from the train!  I took her picture working in her roomette and posted her picture with information about how to contact her to buy her artwork.

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Most employees, when you ask for a picture, will gladly comply, as this Conductor on the GSMRR did, and as did the car attendant on the Skunk Train, left.

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11.16
I wanted to show this motorcar operator on the Skunk Train Line, as he walked back to the Rural Depot between Ft. Bragg and Willits, to await the arriving train from Ft. Bragg and the transferring passengers.
The car attendant (left) who seems to fill the corridor with his size, was professionally dressed and had a great smile.

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Humberto Gomez Herrera
Expreso Maya Director of Operations
humbert@expresomaya.com.mx

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11.18
Amtrak Cafe Car Attendant in his tiny cafe.

Expresso Maya's Trainmaster awaits our return for a stop on the main line so we could take a swim!

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11.19
Nanette prepares for Wine Tasting on the Pacific Parlour Car.  Use of a flash would have eliminated the movement in her hands.
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A Metrolink conductor adjusts the mirror for the cab car engineer before a return from San Bernardino to LAUS.

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An engineer, or conductor, in Fullerton, CA.
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Steam locomotive engineer of the 3751 from San Bernardino, while in LAUS.

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It's nice to see smiling Amtrak Employees.
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Crew change at San Luis Obispo.


11c.  If you get a 'behind-the-scenes' tour, take pictures for your reader-viewers since they may not get to see these things.

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11.25
The Expresso Maya kitchen crew showed me the fruit plates they'd prepared.  They were good at food-art as well.


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The cooks who prepared the fruit plates to the left posed for a picture

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11.27
Abandoned Baldwins at the closed sugar mill in Los Mochis, Mexico.  Sue Stilwell who lead the Copper Canyon trip get me into this area for some unique behind-the-scenes shots that few photographers know about.
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Detrain at 'stretch stops' and walk to the front of the train and you might get pictures of the engineers changing shifts.

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Cooks prepare breakfast on the Expresso Maya in Mexico.


11c.  Train stations are interesting photographs for rail modelers and rail fans.


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Fullerton Santa Fe Amtrak Station (above), early morning.
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Klamath Falls Station (above) and interior shot (below left). 

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